Dan Goswick ‘15

Dan Goswick ‘15

Major: Marketing
Hometown:Amherst, Ohio

The students definitely set Mount Union apart from other colleges and universities. It was something I noticed the first time I was on campus, how inherently nice everyone was by doing the littlest things

Campus News

From Mount Union Students to Education Professors

July 28, 2010

Mount Union assistant professors of education Dr. Mandy (Geddis ’98) Capel and Dr. Melissa Askren-Edgehouse ’99 have both come full circle, returning to their alma mater to teach future educators.“I had Linda Burkey, Tom Gannon and Ted Issue as professors when I was a student here,” said Mandy. “They were the inspiration that ignited my passion for education. It is an honor to be their colleague now.”After graduating from Mount Union in 1998 with a bachelor of arts degree in elementary education, Mandy was certified to teach K-8. She then earned a master of arts degree in general education and a doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction from Kent State University. Mandy taught elementary school at several schools in Northeast Ohio, but when the opportunity arose for her to return to her alma mater, she seized it.“Mount Union has always held a soft spot in my heart.  I wanted to give back to my alma mater and work with future educators.”Mandy believes in the value of working as a team for the benefit of her students as well. Many collaborative opportunities for teacher candidates exist and new opportunities for students are continually being explored. For example, Mandy and Melissa team-taught this year’s Foundations of Education course. Sophomore and senior early childhood majors in assistant professor of education Dr. Shawn Watters’ and Mandy’s classes reaped the benefits of a combined learning experience. “We are working toward more collaborative classes as well,” added Mandy.Melissa also is a stellar product of the Mount Union Teacher Education Program, having earned a bachelor of arts degree from the institution in elementary education in 1999. After graduating from Mount, she taught fifth and sixth grade at Fairless Local Schools in Stark County.  Coincidentally, Melissa graduated high school from Fairless as well, and during her sophomore year Dr. Peter Schneller, professor of education and co-chair of the Department of Education, was her English teacher.While teaching, she earned a master of education degree in administration and supervision from Ashland University.   After six years, she decided to pursue a doctorate, so she moved to Bowling Green, OH.  While at Bowling Green State University (BGSU), Melissa was a teaching assistant and taught undergraduate education majors.  “I was so afraid that 18-22 year old students were going to be much harder to teach than my fifth and sixth graders,” she said. “Surprisingly, they’re not much different!”  Teaching these students made her realize that she would love teaching students of any age.  After earning a doctor of education degree in leadership studies from BGSU, Melissa became a school improvement consultant for the Lucas County Educational Service Center, and she worked with administrators and teachers in Northwest Ohio.  “I really liked offering professional development to teams of teachers and administrators,” she said. “In a way, I was still teaching.  But, just to be sure that I didn’t lose what it was like to be in the classroom, I still taught graduate courses at BGSU in the evenings.”  Melissa had no idea that she’d be returning to her alma mater soon.In March 2009, Melissa was waiting for a flight at Akron-Canton Airport, when she noticed Dr. Tom Gannon, professor of education and co-chair of the Department of Education.“I was surprised. He immediately remembered me,” said Melissa.  “It was so nice to reconnect with him and hear about Mount Union.  I hadn’t had a chance to visit the campus in a couple years.”  They exchanged business cards, and when an education faculty member retired Tom contacted Melissa to see if she was interested in applying for the position. “I loved my time at Mount Union, and I always thought I wanted to return and teach at my alma mater, but I never dreamed it would be this soon,” said Melissa. “I’m so happy to be back! My colleagues are fantastic, and I really enjoy working with them although I must admit that I still have a hard time calling them by their first names!”Since Melissa’s return to campus, she’s been actively involved with integrating technology into a variety of courses in the department.  Educational Media, a course all education majors take, had been typically offered as a face-to-face course but she offered it online this summer and hopes to make the course online in the future. “Some of my students have been wary of taking an online course, but they’ve been doing a great job.  They’re tweeting, blogging, creating screencasts, designing eportfolios, and even occasionally skyping me.  I’ve tried to integrate as many free technologies as possible so they can use them with their future students.  I’m so pleased with their work.”For two alumni to come full circle clearly speaks to the high quality education offered at Mount Union.  These recent additions to the faculty have helped to ensure a consistent curriculum in the department, but one with an eye to the future as well. 

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A Gift for Education

July 28, 2010

“Your energy comes from your passion,” explained Dorothy (Denning ’58) Sisk when asked about how she can possibly manage to find the time to do all that she does to educate children and teachers around the world. “My passion is being a facilitator of developing talents and gifts in both children and adults worldwide.”Dorothy, a member of the Mount Union Board of Trustees, serves as the Conn Chair for Gifted Education at Lamar University’s College of Education and Human Development in Lamar, TX.And this is how this teacher of teachers is spending her summer. “Summer is a particularly busy time for me since I have three research programs going on,” she said. “I run a Texas Governor's School (one of four sponsored by the state) and a Quality Teacher Program in Science in Earth Science Explorations as well as a Success Express program sponsored by Exxon Mobil for four and five year old minority economically-disadvantaged children.”For the past 20 years, 100 16-year old gifted children have been chosen to attend the Texas Governor’s School, thanks to Dorothy. This school for the gifted began in August of 1989 when Dorothy first joined the faculty at Lamar. “I had worked for the government prior to that, so when the commissioner came to Lamar, I asked him how I could help. He was very surprised and asked me to start a Texas Governor’s School. He told me that there would be a match for the money I could raise to start the program and I set about right away to get it accomplished.”The students move into the dormitory at Lamar for three weeks – and Dorothy moves right in with them. In addition, 10 students from each of the previous two classes are brought back to mentor and stay with the students in the dormitory as well. These students learn Chinese (Mandarin) and get to experience other accelerated programs that impact them for a lifetime.“I was recently contacted by a student from that very first class in 1990,” said Dorothy. “He now holds a Ph.D. in economics and said he has vivid memories of the time he spent at the Texas Governor’s School.”Success Express is a two-week session designed for at-risk four and five year olds that integrates algebraic thinking and reading through stories using the theme of animals, both from the farm and the zoo. This program incorporates an integrated approach to strengthen the ideas of students and involves the families in the learning process to lay the foundation for their future success. Classes are set up as learning centers and there is total integration. Even the snacks are planned as part of the educational theme.  “These children are so excited about learning that there are never any discipline problems,” said Dorothy. “We keep them too busy.”In June, she also traveled to Athens, Greece for the International Center for Innovative Education (ICIE), an international conference on education and innovation where she presented a keynote address on developing global awareness in gifted students. Inspired by the conference, she has returned to Texas determined to build a satellite ICIE center in Lamar.  “I want to bring more exposure to diversity to the area,” said Dorothy. “This would include bringing in international speakers and more diversity to enrich the lives of those in the area. When you come face-to-face with a new culture, you become aware of both the differences and the similarities and you grow to uphold the values of difference.”Another result of her trip is a new relationship with educators from Israel whose passion to start a satellite ICIE program was also ignited in Greece. “Two post-doctoral students from Israel are coming to shadow me,” said Dorothy. And what a tall shadow she casts. Her energy is contagious and she is always taking on new and exciting projects with the energy and gusto of a recent graduate poised to educate the world.Dorothy also has a proposal in to Corwin Press, her publisher, to write about caring classrooms, which recognizes the need for gifted students to learn in an environment that values them. “Gifted children experience both intellectual and emotional highs and are often looked upon as immature,” she explained. These children need to learn in an environment that makes them feel welcome and respected and addresses their individual gifts. Dorothy emphasizes teaching through learning communities and is currently teaching 25 teachers to become a part of professional learning community. “The classroom should be a place where everyone feels a sense of belonging,” said Dorothy.As an executive for People to People, Dorothy took a group of 50 educators to Cuba 15 years ago. This coming January she plans to make another visit with a group of teachers. This will be her second trip there. “They are doing everything right with nothing,” she said about the teachers and students there. “We are doing next to nothing with everything.” In Cuba, Dorothy and her group found that the impoverished students “were actually teaching us. They were enamored with the fact that we were doing our best to speak Spanish with them. We were the first group to do so.”And, if that isn’t more than enough for this self-proclaimed whirling dervish, Dorothy is also researching an article on leadership for the Roeper Review, a journal that publishes informative articles that address philosophical, psychological, moral and academic issues affecting the lives and experiences of gifted and talented individuals of all ages. “Leadership is a special type of giftedness,” she said.And Dorothy is certainly a special type of gifted leader and educator.

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46th Annual ArtFest to be Held at Mount Union

July 27, 2010

The 46th annual ArtFest will be held on Sunday, August 1 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Campus Lakes at the University of Mount Union.

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Transition to University of Mount Union

July 19, 2010

Plans are well underway to make the transition to University of Mount Union on August 1, 2010. The change over to the mountunion.edu domain has been completed and e-mail addresses on campus have been changed to username@mountunion.edu.  In addition, campus administrators are working to convert campus signage, promotional materials and other Mount Union items to reflect the transition. On Monday, July 19, 2010, contractors were on campus removing the etched cement featuring the Mount Union College name from the Tomsich Entrance Gates. The newly-etched Tomsich Entrance Gates featuring the University of Mount Union name will be unveiled on Sunday, August 1. To change the designation of the institution, unanimously approved by the Board of Trustees in October of 2009, came after careful review of data gathered through numerous research efforts and thoughtful consideration and discussion. Over the past 30 years, more than 500 private colleges have become universities, and the designation of “university” best describes what Mount Union is today and more effectively communicates all that the institution has to offer. Research indicates that today’s college-bound students view a “university” as an institution that offers increased opportunity and variety, as well as a higher level of prestige, a broader academic curriculum and better-qualified graduates.  In addition, internationally, the word “university” is synonymous with higher education and “college” is equated with high schools or technical institutions. There are a number of additional reasons that support the change. For more information on the transition, visit www.mountunion.edu/university.As the institution moves forward with the university label, it is important to emphasize that those enduring characteristics cherished by the Mount Union community will continue to be hallmarks of the campus experience.  The institution will remain focused on attracting quality students and faculty, providing a sense of community and focusing on a well-rounded education combined with the practical experience critical to career success.  All the while, Mount Union will continue to honor the history and tradition that provides the foundation for future growth and success.

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2000

July 20, 2010

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