Fine Arts Foundations Courses

**HON class codes are reserved for Honors Program Students**

Course Descriptions

ART 100A Introduction to Art.  A general introduction art for students not majoring or minoring in art.  This course will provide students with a broad perspective of the theories, techniques, and practices of the visual arts, design, crafts, architecture and art history. 4 Sem. Hours.

ART 250A Art History Survey I.  This course provides a general survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Pre-historic to the Gothic era in Western and Non-Western cultures. The course content will examine the context of style and era, with consideration of social, economic, political and religious issues. The intention is to provide a knowledge base that gives students a sense of connection with the past and a framework of understanding the roots of our cultures.  4 Sem. Hours.

ART 251A Art History Survey II.   This course provides a general survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from the Renaissance to the Modern Era in Western and Non-Western cultures. The course content will examine the context of style and era, with consideration of social, economic, political and religious issues. The intention is to provide a knowledge base that gives students a sense of connection with the past and a framework of understanding the roots of our cultures.  4 Sem. Hours.

HON 120A Great Plays of Theatre: Are They Still?  Throughout all of theatrical history, playwrights have written plays in a wide variety of different styles. Three to five great plays will be examined using a framework of dramatic analysis and historical context, to answer questions of contemporary relevancy, currency, and immediacy: What was the cultural climate during which the play was written? What were the playwrights trying to say with these plays and do these plays still resonate with contemporary audiences, whether two thousand years or fifty years, after they were first produced? What were these playwrights attempting to say in regards to the nature of being human and our progression through human life? Having lasted this long, will these plays still be produced in another thousand years or so? What makes a great play great? In an attempt to answer these questions, the class will be divided into “production” companies to facilitate 22 new hands-on approaches to the scripting and production of these plays. Honors Foundations focus on research methods and design, the broader intellectual context of the field, a greater emphasis on student autonomy, and connections with other fields. 4 Sem. Hrs.

HON 121A Intro to Creative Writing  A course introducing students to the craft of creating fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and drama. In this course we will explore the various techniques, decisions, styles and approaches used by creative writers. Students will read extensively and participate in exercises designed to develop the creative process. Honors Foundations focus on research methods and design, the broader intellectual context of the field, a greater emphasis on student autonomy, and connections with other fields. 4 Sem. Hrs. 

HON 125A Music, the Arts, and Culture Context  The study of the some of the basic elements, forms, stylistic traditions, social functions, and standard literature of vernacular and art music throughout history. Music's relationships with other art forms, historical periods and movements, religion, and politics are explored, as are the processes of artistic creation and interpretation. Students will begin to develop the tools to evaluate and place into context artistic works. Not a music history survey, this course will focus in depth on several specific genres, time periods, and historical contexts, as determined by the instructor and the students. Attendance at concerts and other cultural events throughout the semester is required. Honors Foundations focus on research methods and design, the broader intellectual context of the field, a greater emphasis on student autonomy, and connections with other fields. Open only to University Honors scholars. 4 Sem. Hrs. 

MUS 200A Music, the Arts and Culture. The study of the basic elements, forms, stylistic traditions, social functions, and standard literature of vernacular and concert music throughout history. Music’s relationships with other art forms, historical periods and movements, religion, and politics are explored, as are the processes of artistic creation and interpretation. Students will begin to develop the tools to evaluate and place into context artistic works. Attendance at concerts and other cultural events throughout the semester is required. 4 Sem. Hrs.

THE 200A People, Society and the Theatre  This course is an introduction to the exciting, complex, and collaborative process of theatre. Comprised of the work of a number of dedicated passionate people (playwrights, producers, directors, designers, actors, and technicians), encompassing historical traditions, and drawing from old and new scripts, theatre culminates in a live performance in front of a live audience, both in the same place at the same time. In this class, we will examine and consider the history, the choices, and the process which results in the production. 4 Sem. Hrs. 

THE 205A History of the American Musical Theatre  Tragedy Tomorrow, Comedy Tonight: The History of the American Musical Theatre. From The Black Crook (1866) to Spiderman: Turn Off the Dark (2011), musical theatre has been an integral part of not only the world of theatre, but the world at large. Although all-too frequently regarded as "fluff entertainment," musical theatre has been responsible for significant social observation and change. From the issues of racism in Showboat (1927) to the questions of AIDS in Rent (1996), unemployment in The Full Monty (1997) and sustainability in Urinetown (2001), musical theatre has often offered the ticket-buying public the palatable opportunity to examine tough issues from a safe place. This course will examine the history, impact, and the effects of musical theatre. 4 Sem. Hrs.

WRT 120A Introduction to Creative Writing.  A course introducing students to the craft of creating fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and drama. In this course we will explore the various techniques, decisions, styles and approaches used by creative writers. Students will also read extensively and participate in exercises designed to develop the creative process. Prerequisite: None. Typically offered every year. 4 Sem. Hrs.

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