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Mount Union Professor Selected as a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Scholar

June 11, 2010

Dr. John Recchiuti, chair of the Department of History, the John E. and Helen Saffell Endowed Chair in Humanities and professor of history at Mount Union has been selected as a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) Summer ScholarDr. John Recchiuti.

Along with a group of 25 professors from across the country this summer, Recchiuti will study the history of economic thought at Duke University’s Center for the History of Political Economy.

The NEH is a federal agency that each summer supports Landmarks of American History and Culture Workshops, allowing faculty to work in collaboration and study with experts in humanities.

“The study of history of economic theory is especially relevant in these times of economic crisis,” said Recchiuti. “I’ve been fascinated with the history of economic theory since my days teaching at Adam Smith’s Wealth of Nations at Columbia University. I’m very thankful to Mount Union – the faculty, Dean Draves and President Giese – for their continued support.”

Recchiuti graduated magna cum laude from Wesleyan University, earning a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy and English. He earned a master of arts degree in comparative British and American labor history from Warwick University in Coventry, England. Recchiuti also earned master of philosophy and doctoral degrees, both in United States history from Columbia University.

In addition to contributing chapters to books and publishing work in various academic journals, he is the author of Civic Engagement: Social Science and Progressive-Era Reform in New York City (2007).

Recchiuti joined the faculty at Mount Union in 1998 and was selected in his first year of teaching at the institution as a NEH Summer Scholar. “My studies in the summer of 1998 afforded me the opportunity to get to know philosophers Charles Taylor and Richard Rorty,” he said. “My students at Mount Union benefited because I was able to incorporate elements of what I learned into their coursework.  I’m looking forward to similar results this year.”

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