Ryan Donaldson ’15

Major: Medical Technology
Hometown:North Canton, Ohio

When I graduated from high school, I knew I wanted to pursue a career in the medical field. I was interested in becoming a medical technologist, and heard that Mount Union had an outstanding medical technology program.

Natural Science Foundations

BIO 140 The Unity of Life.  This course examines the common denominators of all life including biomolecules, cell structure and function, biological energetics, respiration, photosynthesis and genetics.  This class is required of all majors and minors in biology and is a prerequisite for most biology courses.  Laboratories will include inquiry-based experiences.  Two 65 minute lectures and one 3 and half hour lab per week.  4 Sem. Hrs.

BIO 141 The Diversity of Life.  This course examines the “Tree of Life” beginning with its evolutionary foundation followed by an examination of the resulting diversity of life.  This class is required for all majors and minors in biology and is a prerequisite for most other biology courses.  Laboratories will include inquiry-based experiences.  Two 65 minute lectures and one 3 and half hour lab per week.  4 Sem. Hrs.

CHE 100 Chemistry in Society.  This course involves the study of the basic principles of chemistry and their applications to society.  Specific topics are decided upon by the instructor but may include environmental issues, forensic science, energy, food, etc.  This course does not count toward a major or minor in chemistry or a major in biochemistry.  Three class hours and one three hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs.

CHE 110 Foundations of Chemistry.  This introductory course begins with an emphasis on the atomic and molecular nature of matter and the stoichiometric relationships of reactions. These fundamental principles will be applied to reactions in aqueous solutions, the ideal gas law, and an introduction to thermochemistry. Special emphasis will be placed on skills necessary to succeed in chemistry including problem solving strategies. This course is intended for students with 0 or 1 year of high school chemistry or as a preparatory course for CHE 120. Three class hours and one three hour laboratory per week. 4 Sem. Hrs.

CHE 120 Concepts of Chemistry.  . This introductory course is a study of atomic structure, intermolecular interactions, chemical kinetics, equilibrium, and chemical thermodynamics. This course provides a chemical basis needed for the continuing study of chemistry and other natural sciences. Prerequisite: 1 or 2 years of high school chemistry or CHE 110. Three class hours and one three hour lab period. 4 Sem. Hrs.

ENV 190/BIO190 Introduction to Environmental Science.  This introductory-level course focuses on the scientific principles that underlie the functioning of the global environment. The course addresses problems related to human society and explores possibilities for alleviating these problems. The course will provide the student with knowledge of how the environment functions and understanding of the issues of scale, complexity and conflict resolution. . The lab will include field trips, extended case studies and practice making environmental measurements. Cross-listed as BIO 190. Two 65 minute lectures and one 3 and half hour lab per week. 4 Sem. Hrs.

GEO 112 Physical Geology: How the Earth Works.  An examination of the natural processes that shape the earth's past, present and future and their impact on the residents of the planet.  The course will also introduce the methods scientists use to study the Earth. Topics addressed include the formation of earth materials, natural hazards such as volcanoes and earthquakes, plate tectonics and mountain building, and earth history.  There will be three hours of classroom study and one two hour lab each week. Students who complete GEO 112 cannot also receive credit for GEO 116.  4 Sem. Hrs.

*GEO 116 Investigation Earth.  A hands-on exploration of the dynamics that shape planet Earth and an introduction to methods scientists use to study the Earth’s past, present, and predict its future.  The course will examine the origin, evolution, and interaction of the Earth’s lithosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere and the impact these interactions have had on the Earth’s history and on human habitation of the planet.  Students who complete GEO 116 cannot also receive credit for GEO 112. Five hours of combined lecture and lab per week   4 Sem. Hrs.

PHY 110 How Things Work. A non-mathematical introduction to the science of physics intended for non-science students. Topics covered will be from elementary mechanics, properties of matter, sound, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, atomic physics, nuclear physics and relativity. Emphasis will be on the development of a solid qualitative understanding of the physical world. Demonstrations and activities involving physical phenomena will accompany lectures. Six contact hours per week. (Students who have taken PHY 110 may not take PHY 100 except for change of grade.) 4 Sem. Hrs.

PHY 101 General Physics I.  A practical and theoretical introduction to physics covering elements of classical mechanicsincluding kinematics, forces, momentum conservation, energy conservation, work and rotational motion. Elements of vector analysis and calculus are presented. Three class hours and one three hour laboratory session per week. Corequisite: MTH 120, MTH 141 or higher.  4 Sem. Hrs.

PHY 120 Astronomy.  This course is designed to introduce students to the field of astronomy. Topics covered include historical astronomy, the Solar System, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Laboratory sessions include observing constellations and astronomical objects through the observatory’s telescopes.  Six contact hours per week.  4 Sem. Hrs.

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