Dr. Robert Frampton

Teaching Area(s): Doctor of Physical Therapy

The reason I went into education years ago was to help students learn the complicated concepts in physical therapy education in a way that made an impact on them and changed the way PT’s interact with patients and clients.

Physical Therapy Facilities

 

The University of Mount Union intends to launch a Doctor of Physical Therapy Program in the fall of 2016 pending the appropriate approvals. Follow the program’s progress through the accreditation process.

The Physical Therapy program will occupy 13,000 square feet in the newly built Gallaher Hall. The program will have two laboratory spaces with state-of-the-art equipment and one dedicated classroom. The program will also benefit from a separate Motion Analysis Laboratory equipped with a Vicon© Motion Capture System integrated ATMI Force Plates and a wireless Delsys® Trigno™ system.

DPT Classroom

  • 15 lecture/plinth tables
  • Ergonomic seating for 30 students
  • Multimedia equipped classroom
  • Document imaging cameras                            
  • Whiteboards on three walls

Classroom

Teaching Lab A

  • 4 power high/low mat tables
  • 4 folding wall-mount mat tables
  • Folding parallel bars
  • 360-degree display and recording camera system – allows for recording and playback of classroom demos
Lab 1

Teaching Lab B

  • 15 power high/low treatment tables
  • Ergonomic stool seating for 30 students
  • 360-degree display and recording camera system – allows for recording and playback of classroom demos
  • Serial casting facility/equipment
Lab 2  

Student Resource Study Lounge

  • 88 lockers for student use
  • Large flat-screen video monitors for group collaboration work 
  • Soft seating and study areas
  • Small kitchen setup with sink, microwave and refrigerator
  • Library of reference materials
  • Anatomic models 
 

Lounge

 

DPT Motion Lab

  • Vicon© Motion Capture System 
  • Integrated ATMI Force Plates 
  • Wireless Delsys® Trigno™ system
  • This piece of equipment will allow students to analyze movements through review of its components. Information about a movement’s speed, direction, force and muscular activity can be represented diagrammatically. This system allows for the original image of the movement to be superimposed on a represented skeletal system created from the image data
 

Gallaher Hall

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