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Wendell Rogers Discusses Change

February 7, 2011 - by Abby Honaker

Wendell RogersWendell Rogers, an advocate for drug prevention, spoke at the University of Mount Union on Thursday, February 3 in honor of Black History Month.
 
According to Rogers, it has been his goal throughout life to make a positive difference.
 
“If you have the spirit and dream, then you can make the achievements,” he said. 
 
Rogers strongly believes that continuing to do what has always been done will result in the same outcome, no matter how many times you perform the act.  More importantly, if people continue to look at and treat others in the way they always have, people will continue to act in the same ways.
 
According to Rogers, there are three basic rules that individuals need to follow in order to really make a change in the world.
1. Whatever you do, don’t quit and follow your dream.
2. Get up and try something (G.U.T.S.).
3. Believe that you can.
 
He also believes that making change is in the hands of the nonbelievers, and therefore it is up to each individual to find the courage to believe in what needs to be done.  And, all of these ideals take a philosophy of hard work.   
 
Rogers is the director of the GEAR UP Program at The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina. The GEAR UP program provides students with academic enrichment and support from seventh grade until high school graduation in an effort to prepare them for post secondary education. Rogers founded a drug prevention program “Operation,” which is designed for minority youths under the age of 10. The program started in 1989 with 10 boys and now has more than 500 young male participants.
 
Prior to joining the staff at The Citadel, he was the director of operations at Education Redirection and director of clinical services at Essex Substance Abuse Treatment Center. He earned a bachelor of arts degree in communication and social work from Eastern Michigan University and a master of arts degree in rehabilitation guidance counseling from Michigan State University. He also earned a master of arts degree in criminal justice from Saginaw Valley State University.
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