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Neuroscience

The Bachelor of Science degree in neuroscience at the University of Mount Union allows students to explore the impact that the brain has on behavior and mental processes through a number of courses and hands-on experiences with peers and faculty. Students will learn about the physiology of the brain, its impact on behaviors and psychiatric disorders, as well as basic chemistry and biology skills needed to understand neuroscience. The major itself focuses as well on clinical and health outcomes of brain science.

Neuroscience Major Quick Facts  

The neuroscience degree at the University of Mount Union requires a total of 44 major-specific credit hours, as well as 32 credits to fulfill the Integrative Core. The Integrative Core is the University’s general education program and gives students the opportunity to explore areas of interest outside of their field of study as well as give the necessary leadership and communication skills needed for a rewarding career.

Neuroscience is a major that allows students to explore their work in ways in which they gain hands-on experience outside of the classroom, such as: 

  • Psychophysiological and neuropsychological research in an undergraduate laboratory
  • Canine cognition opportunities for students interested in animal research
  • AA project within the drugs and behavior course
  • Build your own illusion project in the sensation and perception course
  • Hands-on laboratory days in the core neuroscience courses
  • Internship opportunities working with Autism in Spectrum Education Center

Learning Objectives

With a broad-base of knowledge regarding behavior and mental processes, a major in neuroscience at the University of Mount Union will prepare you for advanced study in graduate and professional schools in several different areas including:

  • Core work in neuroscience anatomy and physiology
  • Basic science research in courses such as Sensation and Perception and Cultural Health Psychology
  • Applied science research in courses such as Introduction to Autism and Drugs and Behavior

The neuroscience major provides many opportunities for experiential learning through internships and field placements and a robust undergraduate research laboratory setup across multiple faculty members.

DEPARTMENTAL MISSION

The mission of the Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development is to develop and maintain an academic curriculum and co-curricular activities that help students acquire a broad base of knowledge in the field, acquire the intellectual and communication skills necessary to participate in these fields as scientists and practitioners, and develop characteristics that encourage personal fulfillment, meaningful work and responsible citizenship.

DEPARTMENTAL GOALS


Knowledge Base

  • The Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development provides courses, programs, and experiences that foster the acquisition of fundamental knowledge and comprehension of the major concepts, theoretical perspectives, historical trends, and empirical findings to discuss how psychological principles apply to behavioral problems. Students completing foundation courses should demonstrate breadth of their knowledge and application of psychological ideas to simple problems; students completing a baccalaureate degree should show depth in their knowledge and application of psychological concepts and frameworks to problems of greater complexity.


Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking

  • The Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development provides courses, programs, and experiences that enable students to develop the skills in this domain that involve the development of scientific reasoning and problem solving, including effective research methods. Students completing foundation-level courses should learn basic skills and concepts in interpreting behavior, studying research, and applying research design principles to drawing conclusions about psychological phenomena; students completing a baccalaureate degree should focus on theory use as well as designing and executing research plans.


Ethical and Social Responsibility in a Diverse World

  • The Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development provides courses, programs, and experiences that enable students to develop the skills in this domain including the development of ethically and socially responsible behaviors for professional and personal settings in a landscape that involves increasing diversity. Students completing foundation-level courses should become familiar with the formal regulations that govern professional ethics in psychology and begin to embrace the values that will contribute to positive outcomes in work settings and in building a society responsive to multicultural and global concerns. Students completing a baccalaureate degree should have more direct opportunities to demonstrate adherence to professional values that will help them optimize their contributions and work effectively, even with those who do not share their heritage and traditions. This learning goal also promotes the adoption of personal and professional values that can strengthen community relationships and contributions.


Communication

  • The Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development provides courses, programs, and experiences that foster the acquisition of competence in writing and in oral and interpersonal communication skills. Students completing foundation-level courses should write a cogent scientific argument, present information using a scientific approach, engage in discussion of psychological concepts, explain the ideas of others, and express their own ideas with clarity. Students completing a baccalaureate degree should produce a research study or other psychological project, explain scientific results, and present information to a professional audience. They should also develop flexible interpersonal approaches that optimize information exchange and relationship development.


Professional Development

  • The Department of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Human Development provides courses, programs, and experiences that emphasize an application of psychology-specific content and skills, effective self-reflection, project-management skills, teamwork skills, and career preparation. Foundation-level outcomes concentrate on the development of work habits and ethics to succeed in academic settings. The skills in this goal at the baccalaureate level refer to abilities that sharpen student readiness for postbaccalaureate employment, graduate school, or professional school. These skills can be developed and refined both in traditional academic settings and in extracurricular involvement. In addition, career professionals can be enlisted to support occupational planning and pursuit.

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